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The Immune System: Nature’s Own Bodyguard

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The promise of melatonin:

  • Strengthens your immune system.
  • Fight against disease.
  • Maintains youthful health and vigor.
When I refer to melatonin as a disease- fighting hormone, I am not just talking about some new treatment or cure for one particular disease or even several diseases. The implications for melatonin are far more profound.I believe that aging itself is a disease that drains our vitality, and shortens our lives. Ideally, the best way to protect against the various diseases associated with our later years, such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes, is to prevent the destructive effects of aging and to vigorously defend our bodies before disease can take hold. I believe it is possible to do this by taking melatonin. Restoring melatonin to the levels of our youth should not only significantly extend our lives, but also keep our bodies more resistant to disease, and therefore, healthier. What that means is that we can remain physically strong and retain our vigor not just in youth, but throughout our entire lives. As far as we concerned, extending life is meaningless, if we can't also live those extra years in a strong, vital body. It is not enough to simply add decades. They must be decades that are worth living.Melatonin can rejuvenate pineal function, and by doing so can help bolster and preserve the efficiency of each primary organ system in the body. Most importantly, it can boost immunity and thus strengthen our resistance against infections and cancer. It can also help keep our cholesterol levels normal and our hearts strong. It may even be useful for the treatment of problems such as Down syndrome, the most common form of congenital mental retardation, and Alzheimer's disease, and even AIDS.In the next section, you will reed about the many potential medical uses for melatonin currently under investigation by scientists across the globe. I am not giving you this information so that you can self- diagnose or self-prescribe. If you have a medical problem, you should be under a doctor's supervision. What you are about to learn should be used in conjunction with conventional therapy
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The immune System: Nature's Own Bodyguard.

The immune system is our body's defense mechanism against disease. It is a highly sophisticated network of fighter cells that seek out and destroy viruses, bacteria, precancerous and cancer cells, and other invader organisms that can do us harm. The immune system also has to know when not to fight back. For example, it must know how to identify our own body tissues so that it does not wage war against our own organs. It also must allow us to digest and absorb food, which is full of foreign proteins and other substances. If the immune system did not know when to call off its troops, our bodies would reject the food we eat and we would starve.As we age our immune system ages too; it becomes weaker and less effective. Although we produce the same number of disease-fighting cells, these cells do not work as well. That is why older people are more prone to illnesses of all kinds. A child can quickly shake off a cold, but what begins as a sniffle and remains a cold in a child, may develop into a bad case of pneumonia in a grandparent. The older we are, the greater our risk of developing many different forms of cancer.As we age, we are also more vulnerable to disorders of the immune system itself. These are called autoimmune diseases. When they occur, our immune cells become confused, and begin to attack our body's own tissue. This is precisely what occurs in the case of rheumatoid arthritis, a common problem among older people.The gradual breakdown in our immune system need not occur. It happens because our pineal glands are aging, and they are issuing orders to other body systems to age as well. My studies suggest that by taking melatonin, we can keep our immune system functioning at peak capacity, just like it did when we were young. Melatonin works because it resets our aging clock- our pineal gland- so that our hormones and the systems that they regulate are also reset at more youthful, healthier levels. Therefore, the immune system of an older person who is taking melatonin is as strong as a much younger immune system, and that person is bound to stay healthier.In this section, I will describe how the immune system operates, how it is affected by the amount of melatonin secreted by the pineal gland, and how with melatonin supplementation, we can slow down the aging of the immune system. I will explain how, by preserving the strength and resilience of the pineal gland and the immune system, we help protect our bodies from diseases and their degenerative effects. I will show that the best way to fight disease is to prevent it, and that the pineal gland and melatonin can play a vital role in this effort.As I have said in previous chapters of this book, but it bears repeating here, I regard aging as the ultimate disease, and I have also come to recognize that the effect of disease is, in turn rapid aging. To better understand what I mean, consider this: a twenty – five – year – old with AIDS has many of the same health problems as an eighty – year – old, whose immune system has been weakened by aging. In the case of the twenty – five – year – old, disease has ravaged the immune system causing, in effect rapid aging. In the case of the eighty – year – old, aging has weakened the immune system, causing disease, which in turn causes the body to degrade further. I believe that we can intervene and disrupt this aging – disease – aging cycle by strengthening the pineal function and supplementing its melatonin output. Thus, by strengthening the immune system and its disease fighting power, we stare off both the major cause and major effect of what we know as aging.In many ways, the immune system acts as a mirror of the aging process itself. As our body's prime defender, the immune system must be able to distinguish our own cells from undesirable, alien cells; it must protect "self" from "nonself." But, as we get older, our immune system becomes "forgetful" and makes mistakes as a consequence. The reason is that as we age we lose some of the cells in the immune system that are responsible for memory, and that are programmed to distinguish friend from foe. As these cells disappear, the immune system no longer remembers who we are and what makes each of us unique.When this happens, our aging immune system may allow enemy cells to flourish, and as a result we may contract a bacterial or viral infection that we might have easily been able to ward off in our youth. What is equally devastating is when our own immune cells become so confused that they begin to attack our very own tissues and organs; causing the very illnesses the system was designed to prevent. It is as if the "eyes" of our immune system are clouding and becoming unable to distinguish good cells from bad cells. The result of this system breakdown is that we lose some of the integrity of our cellular identity; our "selfness" declines. It is nature's way of slowly writing us out of the play of life to make room for stronger, healthier creatures. This loss of identity and the tangible physical loss that accompanies it extend far beyond the immune system. There is a psychological or spiritual component to this loss of identity that is every bit as real. Picture in your mind the "elderly" people you have known and you will immediately see what we mean. As people grow older and their bodies begin to fail, they often suffer a loss of sense of self that is manifested in depression and a lack of interest in the very things that had once been so important to them, and they become increasingly isolated from the world around them. They become removed from the mainstream of life, grow old in isolation, and they seem to progressively "disappear". While I believe that this phenomenon is in part due to the way certain societies treat their elders, I also believe that what is going on inside the body is responsible. Degenerative changes in the body and the brain work together to accelerate this loss of identity.Melatonin works to prevent the loss of identity, on both the physical and psychic levels. As we will show in this chapter, melatonin can help keep and vigor it manifests in our youth. I believe that accumulating years in a healthy, strong, "young" body will not be the same experience as senescing. This was once thought to be the inevitable and necessary condition of our later decades, but such conventional thinking must now be reconsidered. To the extent that melatonin helps us retain our health and powers as we age, it also enables us to melatonin a strong identity and a firm sense of self.The key of maintaining identity is to maintain a well – functioning, "smart" immune system that can distinguish between good and bad cells and respond quickly to whatever challenges that may come its way. In this chapter, I am going to focus on how the immune system works, and how melatonin can make it work even better.

The immune system is, perhaps, the most complicated, finely tuned system in the body. We are just beginning to unravel its vast secrets, but there is much more scientists still do not understand. Viruses such as HIV, the one that caused AIDS are able to enter the body and subvert the entire immune system in ways that we do not yet fully comprehend, and that also leave us helpless to respond.The immune system is comprised of many different components that perform many different tasks. The main cells of the immune system are white blood cells called lymphocytes. T cells are a particular type of lymphocytes produced in the thymus, a small gland located at the sternum in front of the breastbone. T cells help fight against cancer, certain types of bacteria and viruses, and fungal infections like Candida albicans which can cause troublesome yeast infections in women.T cells are also responsible for the delayed skin reactions that occur after exposure to bacteria. For example, most if not all of you have probably had a skin test for tuberculosis. The physician scratches the skin with a needle contaminated with a minute quantity of the tuberculosis bacillus, the bacterium that causes this disease. If sometime in your life you were exposed to the tuberculosis bacterium, small bumps will appear on the test site a few days later, indicating that the test result is positive. These bumps are caused by angry T cells, which having recognized a know offender, the TB bacillus, rush to the test site to protect you against further injury. T cells, which also protect the body from foreign protein, are also involved in the rejection of transplanted organs. When transplant patients receive new organs, for example, they must be given drugs that will dampen their immune response, so that their bodies do not reject the transplanted organ, which is going to be perceived as a foreign invader.An army of well – functions T cells is critical for our survival. When we age, our T cells become less effective, and as a result, we are more prone to illness. It is also the loss of two kinds of T cells that causes AIDS. One is the type of T cell that protects cells against invasion by viruses and bacteria. The other is the type of T cell that circulates throughout the bloodstream looking for potential troublemakers, functioning as the immune system's cop on the beat. When these crucial T cells are lost, the immune system is virtually knocked out, and the body is unable to fend off disease. As I discuss more fully in the section on AIDS, the effect of this disease, in a very real sense is to prematurely "age" its victims.Other lymphocytes, called B lymphocytes or B cells, produce proteins called antibodies of immuno – globulins. When a foreign substance or antigen is introduced into the body, B cells quickly respond by making antibodies, which attach themselves to the invaders. If this doesn't stop the infection, other immune cells will join in the attack. The body can make thousands of different antibodies, each designed to search out and destroy a specific antigen. Antibodies have an excellent memory, which is why in some cases we can develop immunity to specific diseases after we have had them. A familiar case in point is chicken pox. Most people only get chicken pox once in their lives, and if they are exposed to the chicken pox virus later, they are usually immune to it. The reason is that antibodies that were manufactured in response to the first exposure remain in the bloodstream, continually on watch for the return of the chicken pox antigen. If it appears, the antibodies strike. We do not have to develop the full - blown disease to gain immunity from a virus. For example, when you receive a vaccination against a particular disease, such as measles, the B cells respond by producing specific antibodies against the measles virus. if the measles virus later enters the body in an active state, those previously formed antibodies will attack the virus and, with the help of other cells, destroy it.In addition to fighting against infection, on of the primary functions of the immune system is also to maintain a lookout for sings of cancerous cells, and to destroy them before they can do any harm. Back in 1970, cancer researcher F.M. Burnet coined the work "immunosurveillance" to describe how the immune system closely monitors the body for potential cancers and, upon identifying them, quickly eradicates them. This process occurs continuously in our bodies, and many scientists believe that cancer is actually a disease caused by a malfunctioning immune surveillance system. Many medical researchers believe that keeping our immune system strong may be the best way to effectively prevent cancer, and I discuss this in our chapter on cancer.There are other kinds of immune cells that also play a major role in keeping us well. These cells include macrophages, which are large cells that gobble up foreign material found in the body. Some macrophages reside in the lungs, where they ingest inhaled dust, while others occupy the bone marrow, connective tissue, and the lining of major organs. When a part of the body becomes infected, macrophages are let loose into the bloodstream, through which they travel to the point of infection and do their work.Between the ages of seventy and eight, we tropically experience a dramatic decline in immune function, as I have already mentioned. Although we have as many T cells as we had when we were younger, they are no longer as effective. By this age, no more than half of our aging T cells are still capable of responding to an antigen (enemy) and for some people that number as low as 20%. Why does this happen? This decline occurs because the memory cells if the immune system cease to recognize potential troublemakers and therefore do not respond quickly by dispatching its army of antibodies to disarm them. The consequence is that we get sicker more often.Some T cells are known as helper cells, and, as their name suggests, they help wage the battle against infection. Other T cells are known as suppressor cells, ad these cells actually can suppress an attack by the immune system. For example, suppressor cells keep helper cells from destroying the body's own tissue, and a malfunction of these cells may cause autoimmune diseases. In many older people, for reasons still being researched, the suppressor cells cease to function. In this case, their body's own antibodies begin to attack their own cells. This in turn can trigger the onset of any number of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome (dry mouth, dry eye), and thyroid diseases. Some researchers feel that this friendly fire may not be the fault of the immune system, but actually a result of a slight change in the way proteins are produced by our bodies that often occurs as we age. Although the resulting new proteins are similar to the original ones, they look strange and foreign to the antibodies, which promptly attack them.Our immune system is also affected by environmental factors. For example, malnutrition or viruses such as influenza and HIV can seriously weaken the immune system's capacity to defend against disease. Malnutrition may be one reason why infection is rampant in parts of the world where the population is poorly nourished. We also know that deficiencies in key vitamins and minerals can trigger disease. A deficiency in vitamin C, for example, may cause a decrease in T cells, which, as we have seen, are the disease – killing cells of the immune system. The kinds of foods we consume may also affect immune function. For example, animal studies have shown that a high – fat diet can significantly weaken immune response by impairing T cell function. Not surprisingly, some studies have linked a diet high in fat to an increased incidence of certain forms of cancer in humans.This quick overview helps to make apparent how the immune system plays a critical role in keeping us disease – free and healthy. It also demonstrates that as we age the immune system progressively decay, which results in diminished health. What we have seen about the immune system is that when we are in youthful health, it ensures its efficiency by targeting its enemies on many fronts. When we are under attack, our immune system dispatches its army of T cells, B cells, surveillance cells, antibodies, and other warriors to defend the fortress against invaders. How, then do we protect this vital system from growing old? The answer is melatonin can have a significant positive effect on immune function, on a variety of fronts. In the following section, I will explain how melatonin can keep your immune system working at peak capacity.

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Melatonin Restores Thymus Function

Why do we lose our ability to fight disease as we age? I believe that one reason is that, as we age, we lose our thymus gland, the small gland located behind the breastbone from which the powerful T cells are stored and controlled. The thymus weighs about half an ounce at birth and doubles in size by puberty. After that, it begins to shrink and is replaced by fatty tissue. As this happens, our T cells gradually lose their fighting power. As I explained in Chapters 2 and 3, I have found that when melatonin was added to the nighttime drinking water of older mice, melatonin not only significantly extended their life span, but also kept the mice disease free by improving their immune response. Here is what I found:
  • Melatonin increased the weight of the thymus.
  • Melatonin increased the activity of thymus cells, indicating that they were more actively producing T cell lymphocytes.
  • Melatonin restored skin sensitivity known allergens, a sign that the "memory" of the T cells had been restored. In other words, the cells were better able to identity potential enemies and take action to repel them.
Moreover, in a subsequent experiment, when I transplanted peak – melatonin – producing pineal glands from young mice into the bodies of old mice, and transplanted low – melatonin – producing pineal gland from old mice into the bodies of young, mice, the influence of the pineal on the thymus gland was even more dramatic. The thymus gland of the old mice who had received the young pineal had regenerated, whereas the thymus gland of the young mice who had received the old pineals had withered. Their aging was accelerated! ¹

1. However it is now very clear to me that in fact the engrafted pineals are unable to produce melatonin because they are disconnected from their nerves. Therefore the aging – retarding or the aging – accelerating effect of young or old pineal grafting does not depend on more of less melatonin produced in the night, but rather by the presence or absence of other very important molecules in the pineal cells, which are more abundant in the young pineals than in the old pineals. Therefore nocturnal melatonin administrations serve only to prevent pineal aging and to maintain the pineal capacity to control the activity of the "clock", which is functioning not only with secretion of melatonin, but mainly of the other, mostly unknown molecules! One of them I have identified long ago.
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Melatonin Strengthens Antibody Response

As I discussed in the overview on the immune system, when our immune system age, they become less able to manufacture antibodies – the "troops" that are specifically designed to attack invading organisms such as viruses and bacteria. The result is that, as we age, we become more vulnerable to infection. My research has shown that melatonin supplementation can reverse this downward slide.In one experiment, I tested how a loss of melatonin would affect the body's ability to manufacture these disease – fighting antibodies. I gave mice drugs that had the effect of preventing their pineal glands from producing the usual nighttime surge in melatonin. In each case, I found that the decline in melatonin level resulted in severe suppression of the immune system, and a marked decline in the ability of the mice to produce antibodies. However, when I gave the mice melatonin to restore their normal night – time peak levels, their immune system bounced back. In another experiment, I investigated whether melatonin could improve the immune system's ability to produce antibodies against a foreign invader. In this experiment, two groups of mice received injections of a foreign protein, red blood cells from sheep. The dosage was just enough to immunize the mice, that is, to trigger the production of antibodies against the protein without making the animals sick. Once antibodies are produced against a protein, the body has a built – in memory for fighting against this invader the next time it encounters it. One group of mice was then given melatonin supplements for seven days following the immunization, and the other group was not. Several weeks later I gave both groups another injection of sheep blood cells. As I expected, the mice that had received the melatonin supplements showed a much stronger immune response against the foreign protein than the untreated mice, which proved that melatonin had strengthened their antibody response.This experiment demonstrated that melatonin was able to improve the antibody response against a specific antigen. This is important for several reasons. First, if melatonin can enhance the response to immunization, then there may be good reason to routinely administer melatonin along with standard immunization.Certainly, more research is warranted here. Second, the loss of antibody response is a major problem of aging – perhaps the major problem, in that our inability to wage a strong attack against an invader weakens us and leaves us susceptible to a myriad of health problems. If we can reverse the diminishing efficiency of immune response, or prevent the decline from happening in the first place, I believe we can keep our immune system in a perpetually youthful state. The more youthful our immune system, the less susceptible we are to disease. The less disease we suffer, the less we age. Thus, by strengthening our antibodies, melatonin can stave off a major cause and a major effect of aging. 
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Melatonin Helps Fight Against Viruses

Movies such as Outbreak and books like The Hot Zone underscore our morbid fascination with viruses, those microscopic disease – causing agents that are capable of striking terror in our hearts because the are capable of doing so much damage to our bodies. Unlike bacteria, a virus can only reproduce when it comes in contact with another living cell. When they do come in contact with another living cell they attach themselves to it, and quite literally take over the workings of the cell. When this happens, the cell begins to manufacture more of the virus, and the process repeats. In most cases, a virus is no match for our T cells, and eventually it is beaten down. Some viruses, however, are harder to destroy than others, and some, such as HIV, defeat the immune system before the immune system can defeat the virus. Unlike bacteria, which can be killed by antibiotics, drugs are largely ineffective against viruses. If a virus is found to be the cause of a particular disease, however, it can be isolated and made into a vaccine, a low dose or weakened form of the virus that is just strong enough to trigger the production of antibodies. In this way, the body can develop immunity without actually contracting the virus.Occasionally, science bas been able to develop vaccines to protect us from viruses, but in a world filled with many thousands of old, new, or mutating viruses, vaccines are not a complete solution. Therefore, any substance that helps the immune system ward off a dangerous virus is of great value, and melatonin is such a substance.

 In one study, I injected mice with encephalomyocarditis virus, a lethal virus that causes an infection of the lining of the heart. I then administered melatonin to the infected mice. I found that melatonin decreased the rate of mortality associated with the virus, and also suppressed the potentially damaging inflammatory response that is triggered by the virus. Based on this study, and my other studies that show that melatonin can heighten immune response, I believe that melatonin may knock out some viruses before they can inflict their harm. 
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The Thyroid and Immunity

The thyroid gland lies at the base of the neck, above the thymus. It produces hormones that can increase the production of T cells, and therefore the thyroid is important to the maintenance of a strong immune system. In fact, people with low thyroid function are more prone to infection. My studies have shown that both melatonin supplementation in the drinking water of aging mice, and the transplantation of a young pineal gland into an older mouse can rejuvenate thyroid function. Since an improvement in thyroid function has an overall positive effect on immunity, this is yet another example of how melatonin helps the immune system do its job better.

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Melatonin Blocks Damage to the Immune System Caused by Stress

Stress can have a devastating effect on the immune system. People who are under physical or mental stress are more vulnerable to disease, and more likely to fall prey to a viral or bacterial infection that, under less stressful circumstances, they might be able to shake off. It's been well documented that the caring spouses of people with Alzheimer's disease have depressed immune systems, and it's been suggested that the stress of ministering to a chronically sick relative is responsible for the decline. Other studies have shown that when astronauts return from a space flight, during their first four days back on earth the ability of their T cells to respond to disease is severely impaired. Space flight is a risky business. Clearly the stress of the job is taking its toll on the astronaut's immune system.Stressful situation stimulate the production of corticosteroids by the adrenal glands, which are located on top of the kidneys and are part of the endocrine system. Corticosteroids are important because they raise blood sugar levels, giving us a burst of energy that is needed to cope with a stressful situation. Fox example, if you're crossing a stress and you see a car coming at you, you feel a surge of fear, but you also feel pumped for action. Your thoughts race, your hearts starts to pound, and a sudden burst of corticosteroids, adrenaline as well as other stress hormones, helps your legs faster to get out of harm's way. Similarly when your body is threatened not by an oncoming car but by a viral or bacterial infection, this too is a highly stressful situation for your body systems, and, as a result, you produce more corticosteroids. For example, AIDS patients, as might be expected, often have extraordinarily high levels of corticosteroids. Corticosteroids, however, also have a downside, particularly if you are constantly churning them out. These hormones can dampen the immune response by blocking the production of disease – fighting antibodies, hampering the manufacture of T cells and preventing immune cells from entering the inflamed tissues where they are needed. Over time, stress can also cause significant damage to muscle and connective tissue, parts of the brain, particularly those that control memory, and other body organs. Chronic exposure to corticosteroids due to stress may even be a factor in autoimmune diseases.  There is an antidote to the damage inflicted by these corticosteroids, and it is melatonin. My experiments have shown that when mice who are subjected to stress are also given melatonin supplements, the effect of the overproduction of corticosteroids are moderated. Their thymus glands do not shrivel up, or "age" and they continue to produce normal levels of disease – fighting T cells. Thus, melatonin supplements can help counteract some of the most debilitating health effects of stress.
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The Zinc Connection

As baby boomers begin to age, we predict there is going to be a lot more attention paid to zinc in general, and its interaction with melatonin in particular. Zinc a mineral, is a major player in the immune system, and studies have shown that many older people are deficient in this mineral. In some cases, this may result because they are not getting enough zinc in their diet. But in other cases, it most likely results from the fact that although their diets contain sufficient zinc, their bodies are not absorbing it properly. A zinc-deficient diet in older animals can impair T cells function and result in low levels of thyroid hormone, both of which can inflict serious harm to the immune system.Studies have shown that zinc supplements can produce many of the same beneficial effect to the immune system as melatonin, such as rejuvenating thymic function and generally improving immune response.I am exploring the possibility of a melatonin/ zinc connection in which melatonin is instrumental in the transport and absorption of zinc in the body. I have good reason to suspect this to be the case. My studies with our colleagues in Ancona have shown that melatonin supplements or pineal transplantation from a young mouse to an old mouse can restore low zinc plasma levels to normal values! As I have pointed out in previous chapters, giving an old mouse a new young pineal is a way of increasing melatonin levels in their own old pineal, thus restoring them to their youthful levels. Thus the "aging clock" is rejuvenated and goes on secreting life – generating molecules which are lost in the aging pineal.The decline in zinc blood levels as we age is believed to be responsible for the loss of many functions that typically occur in aging. For example if you are zinc- deficient, you lose your ability to taste food, and not so coincidentally, the loss of taste is a common problem of the elderly. Male sexual function is also linked to zinc, and that, too, can suffer with age. In fact, there is more in the prostate than any other part of a man's body. If melatonin supplements can normalize the zinc levels as we put on years, many of the problems associated with aging, including impaired immune functions, and prostate hypertrophy in men, may by put on hold.
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Sleep And Immunity


Have you ever noticed how, after you've missed too many hours of sleep that you seem to catch every cold that comes your way? Several studies have linked sleep deprivation to a sharp decline in immune function. For example, one study performed at the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center observed twenty – three helthy men, ages twenty – two to sixty – one, for four nights in a sleep laboratory. On the third night, the men were denied sleep between the hours of 3 and 7 a.m., forfeiting about half a good night's sleep. The morning after the sleep deprivation, eighteen of the twenty-three men showed a noticeable decline in activity among the type of T cells that combat viral infections. Fortunately, after a good night's sleep, the activity level of these T cells was restored. The researchers could not say for sure whether this drop in natural killer cells would result in an increased susceptibility to viral infection, but they suggested that it could.The researchers were at a loss to explain why sleep deprivation would have such an immediate and noticeable effect on immune function. Since melatonin blood levels peak during the night, during sleep, it seems obvious to me that lack of sleep may result in a drop or alteration of circulating melatonin, which could contribute to the decline in immunity. In this chapter, I have shown how melatonin, by bolstering our immune system, can help prevent many of the diseases associated with old age. Indeed, I regard this as melatonin's single most important contribution as a disease-fighting hormone. The downward spiral of physical decline associated with growing old, which has become known as senescence, is the primary cause of all other diseases that strike in our later years. By maintaining the body in a youthful state with melatonin, we will be able to prevent the dismal decline that is characterized by physical degeneration and debilitating illness. With melatonin, we should be able to fortify ourselves against the diseases of aging. With melatonin, we do not have to live out our later years in an increasingly sick and broken body. Melatonin is not only an age – reversing hormone that will add years to your life, but what is even more exciting is the promise of adding healthy years.In the next few chapters, I will describe the work of researchers around the world who are exploring different ways to utilize melatonin's disease – fighting properties for the treatment and prevention of common disease such as cancer and heart disease. I will also show how melatonin may prove to be a useful therapy for a wide range of other diseases, including Alzheimer's, AIDS, eye disorders, diabetes, Down's syndrome and other common ailments
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Melatonin For A Strong Immune System


By taking melatonin supplements, we can boost our immune function, which otherwise declines with age. Our age-reversal therapy works in large part because melatonin supplements can help restore the immune system to its youthful capacity. Since our melatonin levels begin to decline in our forties, we need to replenish our natural melatonin supply and thereby help to restore our immune function to its youthful level. As I have stated throughout this book, it is my belief that the best way to fight disease is through prevention, and a strong immune system is our best defense. The dosage of melatonin that is right for you will depend on your age. 
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Disclaimer: The information presented herein strictly reflects the opinion of Prof. Walter Pierpaoli and is intended to provide information and for educational purposes. The information herein intends to support, and not replace, the existing relationship between a patient/visitor of this website and his/her referring physician and, in no case, can it be considered a diagnosis or used as an alternative to a medical examination. Prof. Pierpaoli undertakes no responsibility for any health consequences of any person who reads and follows the information contained on this site. All readers of the contents on this website, especially those who take prescription or over-the-counter drugs, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutritional or supplemental program or prior to making lifestyle changes. The contents herein are in compliance with the guidelines relevant to the application of arts. 55, 56 and 57 of the new Code of Medical Ethics and are intended for the general public.